Sunday, August 21, 2016

1940 Salisbury Massachusetts Street Name Changes and Photos of the 1953 Interstate 95 Construction

If anyone has maps with old street names or photos to share please contact me! Thanks 




Photos construction near Interstate 95 from the Bartlett Farm Family Collection.

Many homes were demolished or moved when the interstate went in. The Eastman Stearns Family home moved from 315 Elm Street and is now located behind Bartlett's Farm Stand.  Click Link to Read More Stearns Family Project

The John Greenleaf Whittier Bridge was built in 1951 connecting Newburyport and Amesbury over the Merrimack River.
This is a 1940 Boston Herald clip announcing the name changes in Salisbury.



1985 Town Report Amesbury, Massachusetts   
Nostalgia photos: Highway construction The Sun Chronicle 
History of Salisbury, Massachusetts Rebecca Beatrice Brooks

Friday, August 19, 2016

Mirrors of Newburyport: Bernard Cermenati & The Timothy Dexter Mansion


From Antiques, Volume 2 NO.4 October 1922: The mirror itself is illustrated and runs true to early nineteenth-century type. The picture panel above the glass, however, is especially interesting, since it bears evidence of being an attempt at the depiction of an actual structure, though the multiplication of Palladian windows in the front elevation constitutes a somewhat disturbing design in fenestration for an era which seldom lost sight of the nice subtleties of emphasis. When, some fifteen years since, the present owner of the mirror purchased it in Bethlehem, New Hampshire, she was told that the mansion of the panel was supposed to be the residence at Newburyport of Sir Timothy Dexter, an ancient resident. Material for either verifying or disproving this tradition is not at the moment available to the Attic. But there should be plenty of it in Newburyport. Perhaps some resident of that town, who is possessed of a liking for historical research, may be able to offer to the confraternity of the Attic some further enlightenment as to Cermenati, Timothy Dexter, and the House of the Palladian Windows. In her article, Tabernacle Mirrors, published in Antiques Magazine for July 1922, Alice Van Leer Carrick laments her early neglect to copy the advertisement of a Newburyport frame-maker, which she once encountered on the back of a fine American mirror. Mrs. Charles E. Atwood, of New York City, it is possible to publish not only the name and advertisement of this Newburyport craftsman, but, as well, a picture of one of his mirrors. His name was Barnard Cermenati, indication apparently of old-world origin, perhaps of old-world training. His advertisement consists of a label pasted to the back of a mirror. Unfortunately it is too badly faded to admit of photography, but it is legible enough and presents the following information:

                                                         LOOKING GLASSES

BARNARD CERMENATI Carver, Gilder, Picture Frame is Looking Glass
Manufacturer No. 10 State Street, Newburyport Keeps constantly for sale at the most reduced prices A complete assortment of 

Looking Glasses, Picture Glasses, Prints, Spy Glasses, Thermometers, Glazier, Diamonds of the firs! quality, Drawing Paper, Paints, Pencils, Etc. Ladies' Dressing Glasses of all sizes. Looking Glass Plates of all sizes to fit old frames. Window Glass of all sizes. With all kinds of Frames in his line.Gentlemen and Ladies will gratify Mr. C. by calling and examining the above articles, whether they purchase or not. 

(Below I have posted a few articles found in the old news paper archives) According to Harvard Magazine Bernard Cermenati was from Italian origins. He was in partnership with John Bernarda and later with Monfrino. In 1807 Cermenati opened a looking glass store at 10 State Street in Newburyport. Historic New England Collections notes he moved to Salem at the end of 1809.REF: Webster Signature Cermenati made and sold telescopes and thermometers. Essex Street, Salem; No. 2 State Street Boston (1807); both in Mass. A reference in Antiques and the Arts Weekly:  Americanists no doubt spotted Thomas Coulborn & Sons. The West Midlands, UK, dealer handsome pair of Bilbao mirrors. Made in Spain around 1809 the mirrors with Cermenati’s label are in the collection of Historic New England and Coulborn’s pair once belonged to New England collectors Judge Arthur Beane and his wife, Mary Elizabeth Clarke. Skinner auctioned pieces inherited by the judge’s son, Arthur Beane Jr of Duxbury, Mass., in November 2010.

Other examples of Cermenati's work 
Historic New England as noted in article Newbury Furniture by Nancy Carlisle.


Skinner Federal Gilt-gesso Eglomise Mirror Auction: 2538B Lot: 142 Sold for: $889



From James D Julia Spectacular Samoset 2002 Auction
Grosses Over $2.4 Million! Auction: August 22 & 23, 2002

FINE FEDERAL MIRROR WITH EGLOMISE` PANEL WITH LABEL BY CERMENATI & BERNARDA. Original label on reverse of one board backboard. “Cermenati & Bernarda Carvers, Gilders, Picture frame, and Looking Glass Manuf. No. 2 State Street Boston”. Newspaper affixed to back is dated 1827. Mirror has fluted columns overhanging cornice with ball decoration. Gilt chalice of flowers against a white reverse painted background. Original mirror present. SIZE: 45 1/2″ h CONDITION: Four balls missing, small piece of gesso decoration missing, otherwise very good. 9-91556



Pair of Neoclassical Gilt Gesso and Pink Marble "Bilbao" Mirrors Auction: 2524B Lot: 63 Sold for: $21,330 Skinner Auction House Auction: American Furniture & Decorative Arts - 2524B Location: Boston Date / Time : November 07, 2010 11:00AM Description: Pair of Neoclassical Gilt Gesso and Pink Marble "Bilbao" Mirrors, Northwestern Spain, label of the importer Bernard Cermenati in Newburyport, Massachusetts, c. 1805-10, (imperfections), ht. 49 1/2, wd. 24 in. Literature: In The Looking Glass in America, 1700-1825, by Helen Comstock, a pair of similar Bilbao mirrors are illustrated, p. 80, fig. 53. Comstock writes, "Bilbao mirrors reached America about 1790-1810 in some thus far unexplored phase of [America's] trade with Europe. They take their name from Bilbao (formerly sometimes written Bilboa), a port in northwestern Spain near the French border that was frequented by American merchant ships in the 18th century. Note: Mirrors with labels reading: "Bernard Cermenati, Carver, Gilder, Picture Frame and Looking Glass Manufacturer, No. 10 State Street - Newburyport."
Estimate $4,000-6,000 See link https://issuu.com/skinnerinc/docs/2524b


The two mirrors sold by Thomas Coulborn & Son
Provenance:
Imported and retailed by Bernard Cermenati (Newburyport, Massachusetts) c.1805-1809.
Collection of Judge Arthur Beane Sr and his wife Mimi Clarke, daughter of the noted silver expert Herman Frederick Clarke. They collected in the 1920s and 1930s, and lived in the William Sever House in Kingston, Massachusetts, after which they moved to Duxbury, Massachusetts. By descent to Arthur Beane, Jr.

With gilded gesso over wire frame ornamentation at both the top and the base, including motifs of flowers, vases and two serpents on each mirror. The marble frames have columns on either side. With minor restorations to the ornament and original gilding, both mirrors retain the original glass. The labels read: “Bernard Cermenati, Carver, Gilder, Picture Frame and Looking Glass Manufacturer, No. 10 State Street – Newburyport.” - See more at: http://www.coulborn.com/furniture-categories/notable-sales/a-pair-of-spanish-neoclassical-gilt-gesso-and-pink-marble-bilbao-wall-mirrors-2/#sthash.1i7ebG6s.dpuf
With gilded gesso over wire frame ornamentation at both the top and the base, including motifs of flowers, vases and two serpents on each mirror. The marble frames have columns on either side. With minor restorations to the ornament and original gilding, both mirrors retain the original glass. The labels read: “Bernard Cermenati, Carver, Gilder, Picture Frame and Looking Glass Manufacturer, No. 10 State Street – Newburyport.”

With gilded gesso over wire frame ornamentation at both the top and the base, including motifs of flowers, vases and two serpents on each mirror. The marble frames have columns on either side. With minor restorations to the ornament and original gilding, both mirrors retain the original glass. The labels read: “Bernard Cermenati, Carver, Gilder, Picture Frame and Looking Glass Manufacturer, No. 10 State Street – Newburyport.”
Provenance:
Imported and retailed by Bernard Cermenati (Newburyport, Massachusetts) c.1805-1809.
Collection of Judge Arthur Beane Sr and his wife Mimi Clarke, daughter of the noted silver expert Herman Frederick Clarke. They collected in the 1920s and 1930s, and lived in the William Sever House in Kingston, Massachusetts, after which they moved to Duxbury, Massachusetts.
By descent to Arthur Beane, Jr.
“Bilbao mirrors reached America about 1790-1810 in some thus far unexplored phase of [America’s] trade with Europe. They take their name from Bilbao (formerly sometimes written Bilboa), a port in northwestern Spain near the French border that was frequented by American merchant ships in the 18th century.” (Comstock op. cit.) Interestingly, these mirrors retain the original label of their importer Bernard Cermenati. Cermenati was an Italian immigrant working in eastern Massachusetts in the early nineteenth century. His earliest recorded advertisement was on August 28th 1807, in Newburyport, as a carver, gilder and looking-glass and frame maker. His store there was located at 10 State Street. He remained there for two years before removing to Salem at the end of 1809, and is listed in the Boston directories in 1811 and from 1813 to 1818.
Literature: In The Looking Glass in America, 1700-1825, by Helen Comstock, a pair of similar Bilbao mirrors are illustrated, p. 80, fig. 53.
- See more at: http://www.coulborn.com/furniture-categories/notable-sales/a-pair-of-spanish-neoclassical-gilt-gesso-and-pink-marble-bilbao-wall-mirrors-2/#sthash.1i7ebG6s.dpuf




John & Rico's Antique American and European Furniture from Their Drawing Room of Newport. Located in Newport Rhode Island # 5220. A pair of fine late 18th early 19th century Bilbao Mirrors. Size: 15" wide and 32" tall. Condition: the gesso/wire decoration is in excellent condition and the gilding appears to be intact; the mirror/glass is appropriately distressed because of age (when these mirrors were first used, people with powdered wigs were looking at their reflections); the marble columns and framing may have had some restoration over the years, but there are no apparent serious problems. These mirrors are more commonly seen in finer New England 18th century homes. It is rare to find a pair in such nice condition. A similar pair are on exhibit at at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, (G328). Literature: In The Looking Glass in America, 1700-1825, by Helen Comstock, a pair of similar Bilbao mirrors are illustrated, p. 80, fig. 53. Comstock writes, "Bilbao mirrors reached America about 1790-1810 in some thus far unexplored phase of [America's] trade with Europe. They take their name from Bilbao (formerly sometimes written Bilboa), a port in northwestern Spain near the French border that was frequented by American merchant ships in the 18th century. Note: A similar pair of mirrors sold at Skinners Auctions for almost $22,000.00 in the Fall of 2010 with labels reading: "Bernard Cermenati, Carver, Gilder, Picture Frame and Looking Glass Manufacturer, No. 10 State Street - Newburyport." Our mirrors are un-labeled. Price: $22,500.00 the pair.
Mirror-Wall; Federal, Gilt Wood, Cermenati (Bernard) Label, 52 inch. A rare signed Federal giltwood mirror, labeled by Bernard Cermenati Portsmouth, New Hampshire, early 19th century.



CRN Auctions Lot 96 : NEAR PAIR OF SMALL CHIPPENDALE MAHOGANY WALL MIRRORS Boston, c. 1800, one with paper label: Cermanati and Monfrino, Carvers, Gilders, Picture Frame and Looking Glass Manufacturers, No. 2 State St. Boston with gilt plumage to crest, 28.5"h, (one ear replaced, missing part of plumage); the other mirror with gilt eagle in crest, 29.5"h









Cermenati married Mary Rose Francis on April 10 1808 and vital records show one son Joseph, born November 4, 1808. Mary Cermenati looking glass store 6 Hanover St. (1818).



  • Chipstone Nancy Goyne Evans The Written Evidence of Furniture Repairs and Alterations: How Original Is "All Original?"
  • Barnard Cermenati, April 19, 1810, to Joshua Ward, Salem, Massachusetts, Ward Family Manuscripts. 
  • The Magazine Antiques Volume 119 Straight Enterprises, 1981
  • Zachys Christie's East Christie's East, Dec 12, 1980
  • Old-time New England, Volume 77, Issues 266-267
  • Matrimony Notice Saturday, April 16, 1808 Times, Boston, Massachusetts International Fine Art And Antique Dealers Show Changes With The Times November 8, 2011 Antiques and the Hearts Site Article
  • Vital records of Newburyport, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849.
  • Advertisement Friday, March 27, 1807 Newburyport Herald (Newburyport, Massachusetts
  • Advertisement Friday, June 29, 1810 Salem Gazette (Salem, Massachusetts)
  • Advertisement for Apprentice Friday, September 16, 1808 Newburyport Herald (Newburyport, Massachusetts)
  • Advertisement with Frame Photo Tuesday, February 23, 1808 Newburyport Herald (Newburyport, Massachusetts) 
  •  American Furniture & Decorative Arts - 2538B Boston March 06, 2011 Skinner 
  • Skinner Ma American Furniture & Decorative Arts - 2786B Boston March 01, 2015 Description: Mahogany and Gilt-gesso Mirror, Boston, Massachusetts, c. 1806-07, the scrolled frame with pierced cresting of feathers and gilt incised liner, chalk inscription on backboard "Cermenati & Bernarda," 30 x 15 3/4 in.

Saturday, June 11, 2016

Photo Anna Bartlett Seavey views First Trolley to come through Salisbury Massachusetts


Mary Anna Bartlett born October 1882 d. of Anthony Willis Bartlett and Mary Abbie Morrill of Salisbury, Massachusetts. She was known as "Anna" married George Seavey (1875-1943) son of Charles Seavey and Hattie S. I. McDaniel. Anna died February 7, 1919 (See Death Certificate below) 

A photo of Anna watching the first trolley come through Salisbury, Massachusetts. Thanks to Donna Bartlett of Bartletts Farm for this photo.

According to the Amesbury City Site:  

Amesbury and Newburyport have been closely connected from the earliest days of the settlements and the earliest street railroads were between the two towns with horse drawn cars. Newburyport Car Company, in 1886, was the first to build cars for the its line to Amesbury. Ellis Car Co. started in 1889 and Briggs Car Co. followed in 1890. Both of these were in Amesbury. All three companies had cars running on the same lines and built cars for other railways throughout the country.

The railways that are featured here encompasses the Merrimac Valley and the towns of Exeter and Hampton New Hampshire that had connections to Amesbury. They were very small and connected to each other so as to complete longer lines. The Plum Island Railway ran from one end Northern Boulevard to end of Southern Boulevard, Black Rock and Salisbury Beach Railway first ran from Black Rock on the southern end to the Seabrook Line on the northern end. Later it was extended to the Hampton River; The Newburyport & Amesbury Railway ran from the center of Plum Island to Market Square in Amesbury via the Chain Bridge and Main Street with a line from Amesbury to Merrimac via River Road to Merrimacport and on to Merrimac Center. Exeter, Hampton, and Amesbury Railway was from Exeter to Hampton Beach Casino with a line from Smithtown in Seabrook to Market Square in Amesbury. All of these became a part of the history of trolley cars in Amesbury.

There were five trolley railways plus the B. M. Railroad, connected to Amesbury: Newburyport and Amesbury, Haverhill and Amesbury; Hampton and Amesbury, Haverhill, Plaistow, and Newton, and Exeter, Hampton, & Amesbury. This is the reason why it was called THE HUB. All trolley travelers West and North of Amesbury wanting to travel to the Seacoast had to come through Amesbury. 



Monday, June 6, 2016

New Book on Harbor Range Lights of Newburyport Massachusetts by historians Skip and Marge Motes


Photo from book cover: Forward range light on Deford's wharf seen from railroad trestle, circa 1873.

THE HARBOR RANGE LIGHTS, located in Newburyport’s Historic District and on the National Register of Historic Places, have been prominent on the Newburyport waterfront for nearly 150 years. They were first lit May 27, 1873, with “such great brilliancy as to be seen distinctly ten to twelve miles at sea.” But their story had yet to be told. 


Drawing on primary sources and the rich photographic resources of the waterfront, local historians “Skip” and Marge Motes, have written a comprehensive history of the harbor range lights and their place in Newburyport’s maritime heritage. Their story is illustrated with over forty photographs and maps chronicling the decline of Newburyport through the Great Depression into the 1960s, and then the optimism of renewal and growth to the present. The book takes the reader on a unique journey from 1873 to the present. The Motes have proved conclusively that the forward range light was never moved from its original 1873 location, contrary to published claims.

Also, for Genealogy, History Buffs, and Researchers the book is loaded with detailed information on the local families and their ties to the Port. Ship photos and the legend of the old maritime days. The Coast Guard, light house keepers, and businesses on the wharf. Photographers who preserved this rich history are all in the book. Here are some mentions: 
  • Benjamin Butler 
  • George Stickney
  • Mayor Albert Currier
  • Charles M Bayley
  • George Cashman
  • Daniel Ingalls Tenney
  • Ship Whittier
  • Selwyn Reed 
  • Victor Manufacturing Company
  • Samuel Deford
  • Ezra B Chase
  • Robert Bayley
  • Sumner, Swazey, & Currier
  • W. H. Lincoln Ship
  • Tennyson Ship 
  • Albert Currier
  • Coffin's Wharf
  • America yacht 
  • Colonel J. C. Duane
  • Edward Lameyer schooner 
  • Cushings Wharf 
  • Towle Manufacturing Company 
  • Henry Coit Perkins 
Harvard Book Store 
Jabberwocky in Newburyport
Newburyport Custom House Maritime Museum 
has the book and a copy is at the Archival Center located at Newburyport Public Library

Sunday, June 5, 2016

Henry Wood and the Girouard Family of Leominster Massachusetts

Currently working on the Hart Line and descendants of Isaac Hart. This is a branch of Carolyn Hart Wood's line. Her grandfather, Henry Wood married Marie Anne Girouard.Below is a photo of Girouard ladies Claire and Malvina. Any information please post. Thank You! 






Henry Wood (above) was born on September 23, 1901, in Spencer, Massachusetts, s. of Patrick Wood and Emma Paul. He had one son with Marie "Annie" Girouard (above) d. of Nazaire Girouard and Marie Blanche Girouard. Henry died on December 8, 1966, in Leominster, Massachusetts, at the age of 65. Below a photo of Annie and Henry's store on variety/ luncheonette on Mechanic Street in Leominster Ma. Henry, Annie, and Henry, JR. working at Henry's Variety.  Photos below of Henry Wood, JR in Air Force and Stevens'College. Henry Wood Jr was born on April 9, 1931, in Newark, New Jersey. He was veteran of the Korean War, serving mostly overseas with the US Air Force. Henry JR. married Elizabeth Hart Marlowe d. of William J Marlowe and Grace Hart.













(Marie) Annie Girouard of Nazaire Girouard and Marie Blanche Girouard born on April 2, 1901, in New Brunswick. Wife of Henry Wood. 

Emma Paul d. of Daniel Paul and Sophie Collette born in Spencer, Massachusetts. Mother of Henry Wood, SR. Wife of Patrick J Wood. 


Patrick J Wood s. of Patrick Wood and Mary Knight b. March 17, 1868, in Salem, Massachusetts. M. Emma Paul on June 26, 1893, in Spencer, Massachusetts


The Girouard Brothers Louis, Edmond, Albert, Phil,and Benoni all born to Nazaire Girouard and Marie Blanche Girouard.

Malvina Girouard born on January 20, 1892, in Kent, New Brunswick d. of Nazaire Girouard and Marie Blanche Girouard

Claire Girouard d. of of Nazaire Girouard and Marie Blanche Girouard born November 9, 1887 

Emilia Girouard and brother Hector Girouard. Hector was born on September 19, 1896, in Kent, New Brunswick, s. of Nazaire Girouard and Marie Blanche Girouard. He had five brothers and five sisters. He died in 1918 in Leominster, Massachusetts, at the age of 22.


Marie Blanche Girouard born September 21, 1861, in Kent, New Brunswick, d. of Louis Jean Girouard and Euphemie Jaillet, was 16. She married Nazaire on November 9, 1895, in Kent, New Brunswick. They had 11 children in 19 years. She died on February 19, 1955, in Leominster, Massachusetts, at the age of 93. Below is a group family photo of Girouard Clan


Albert Girouard and sons Norman and Albert, JR. Albert was born on February 14, 1889, in Kent, New Brunswick s. of Nazaire Girouard and Marie Blanche Girouard. Albert married Amanda LaLonde d. of Stanislas Lalonde and Henriette Beauchamp. 

Amanda LaLonde, wife of Albert Girouard born in 1894 in Michigan. Mother to Norman Girouard b. on January 6, 1919, in Leominster, Massachusetts and d. on July 8, 2002, in his hometown, at the age of 83. Mother to Albert Girouard, JR b. on October 10, 1920 in Leominster, Massachusetts and d. January 3, 2015 in Epoch Senior Healthcare Center of Brewster, Massachusetts. He was 94.

Henriette LaLonde (Beauchamp/Archambault) sitting in middle, Second husband Stanislas in back on left and son Edward on back right.

Stanislas LaLonde with wife Henriette Beauchamp/Archambeault/LaLonde and their daughter Emile (the youngest child). Back; Milleneau, Edward, Elida, Joseph all Archambaults. Front: Vicgtoria (on left) and Albina (midle girl) both Archambault's.

Stanislas LaLonde and Henriette Beauchamp LaLonde taken before 1920.

Henriette Beauchamp Lalonde with her daughter Milleneau LaLonde Archambault

The Girouard Sisters Annie, Rose, Aline, and Malvina. Probably taken in Lemonister. 

Vitaline, Josephine, and Marie Blanche Girouard and below Sister Vitaline Girouard in her official church position.



Group Photo above of Girouard and Wood Family and one below of the the Henry and Annie Wood with other Family members in Canada.